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Center for Puppetry Arts

1404 Spring Street NW at 18th
Atlanta, GA
www.puppet.org
404-873-3391

Sara Hanna Photography

The Jim Henson Collection

Center for Puppetry Arts

ONGOING
Monday-Friday: 9am-4:30pm
Saturday: 9:30am-5pm
Sunday: 12pm-5pm
Non-Members: $10.50, Members: FREE

In 2007, Jim Henson’s family announced a momentous gift of puppets and props to the Center for Puppetry Arts. We are thrilled that approximately half of our expanded museum space is dedicated to the Jim Henson Collection.

This interactive exhibition follows Henson’s prolific imagination chronologically, transporting visitors through environments that typified the master puppeteer’s world such as Jim’s Office and the Television Studio.

In addition to learning how Henson’s characters came to life and are still performed, visitors can view iconic puppets such as Kermit the Frog and Miss Piggy.

Center for Puppetry Arts

1404 Spring Street NW at 18th
Atlanta, GA
www.puppet.org
404-873-3391

Sara Hanna Photography

The Global Collection

Center for Puppetry Arts

ONGOING
Monday-Friday: 9am-4:30pm
Saturday: 9:30am-5pm
Sunday: 12pm-5pm
Non-Members: $10.50, Members: FREE

The Global Collection celebrates puppetry traditions in major cultures from around the world. Highlighting the history of puppetry in Asia, Africa, Europe, and the Americas, this Collection also demonstrates the use of the art form as a teaching and communication tool.

Organized by continent, artifacts are displayed with rich, contextual backdrops and hands-on interactives that encourage patrons to immerse themselves in puppetry traditions from around the world.

Yale - Whitney Humanties Center

Malay Theatre

curated by Kathy Foley (Wayang) with Patricia Ann Hardwick (Mak Yong)

January 18 - June 3, 2017
Monday and Wednesday, 3-5 pm or by appointment.
Call 203.432.0669 for appointment

Major Malay intangible cultural heritage forms include shadow puppetry wayang kelantan (formerly wayang siam) and the 2005 UNESCO recognized female dance drama mak yong. Beginning in 1991 after PAS (Partai Islam Se-Malaysia, Pan-Malayian Islamic Party) took over the government of Kelantan (1990), mak yong and wayang were banned as “un-Islamic” due to opening rituals, stories about Hindu god-heroes or local spirits, the concept of god-clowns, and other elements which were termed “syrik” (worshipping a god other than Allah). In the same period the artists of these forms were being named Seniman Negara (National Artist)—for example puppeteer Dalang Hamzah bin Awang Hamat (1993) and mak yong actress Khatijah Awang (1999)—their arts were ironically banned in their home state of Kelantan. Noted artists migrated to Kuala Lumpur to teach in schools, albeit in a technical and secularized format.

The ban led to a precipitous decline in the traditional arts. In 1969, Amin Sweeney found 300 puppeteers active in Kelantan; in 2015 five active dalang are found. Few go through the ritual initiation (believed to make one a full artist). The only puppeteer who freely performs in the traditional ways of this Muslim Malay art is a Chinese Buddhist Dalang Eyo Hock Seng (Pak Cu), who as a non-Muslim is free to practice the art with mantras. The government advertises the genres to promote tourism—and the one place in Kelantan that the genres for a long period could be legally performed was at the tourist venue, Gelanggang Seni (Arts Complex) in Kota Bharu. Permission to present performances to local audiences was banned due to animist and Hindu-Buddhist elements and the idea that males and females might mix and begin liaisons. The arts of wayang (puppetry) and female dance are often traditionally credited to the Muslim teachers of the Indo-Malay world, the wali songgo (nine saints), who converted Java and some versions say Malaysia to Islam. Local traditions see links to Islamic Java. This exhibit explores the ambivalence such arts have encountered due to both modernization and the Saudi inspired “Islamic Revival” since the 1980s.

Wayang and nang are puppet arts that share feature and cluster around the Gulf of Thailand. Trade routes bind the Malay areas of north coast of Java, Kelantan on the east coast of Malaysia, and Southern Thailand. Small figure puppetry, female dance drama, and trance dance genres are found in these areas. Arts probably moved along trade routes changing with local tastes.

The anti-iconic bent of Middle Eastern Islam was not part of the practice of Southeast Asian Islam, which was largely introduced from Champa, China, and areas of India. Some Shi’a influences Persia-Punjab were also found. The late 20th century Islamic revival however follows Wahabi models, which, unlike local Islam, rejects representation of the human form, calls for veiling of women, frowns on cross-gender acting (i.e., women playing men as in mak yong), bans women and men playing together in the same performance, questions mixed gender audience seating, and reject spirit beliefs and philosophies that are part of local genres.

Northwest Puppet Center

9123 15th Ave. NE
Seattle, WA
www.nwpuppet.org/museum.html
206-523-2579

Pass on the Pupptry Arts: An Exhibition of Traditional Chinese Puppetry

Northwest Puppet Center

ONGOING
Open before/after shows and by appointment.
Free

Throughout the centuries, Chinese puppetry traditions have been passed from one generation to the next. Huang Yi Que, the great marionette master of Quanzhou, was impressed by Northwest Puppet Center's commitment to preserving global traditions so he commissioned a scroll which roughly translates as "Pass on the Puppetry Arts". With this in mind, we are proud to present an exhibit featuring an array of Chinese puppets including works by Huang Yi Que, Yang Feng, and many more from The Cook/Marks Collection.

The Bread and Puppet Museum

753 Heights Road
Glover, VT
breadandpuppet.org/museum
802-525-3031

The Bread and Puppet Museum

Bread and Puppet Theater

The museum is open June 1 to November 1, daily 10 am to 6:00 pm, and is also open before and after evening performances. There is a museum tour every Saturday at 6:00pm and Sunday at 1:00 pm during July and August. During the cold months, it is officially closed, but may be opened by appointment or chance.
Admission is free; donations are welcome

The Bread and Puppet Museum is a massive accumulation of the puppets, masks, paintings and graphics of the Bread and Puppet Theater, housed in a 150-year-old barn in Vermont’s Northeast Kingdom, 25 miles south of the Canadian border. It is one of the largest collections of some of the biggest puppets and masks in the world. It was created in 1974 when Bread and Puppet Theater moved to this former dairy farm after a residency at Goddard College, and before that close to a decade in New York City. The museum is full to the brim; its population density is an expression not only of the accumulations of time but of the urgencies which inspired the making of so much stuff: the poverty of the poor, the arrogance of the war-mongers, the despair of the victims, and maybe even stronger than that, the glory of this whole god-given world. And naturally, all this will decay in due course.

Grouped according to theme, color, or size, the puppets recreate dramatic scenes from bygone shows and form striking compositions with hand-printed banners and paper-mache reliefs. Over the years, the collection has expanded to fill two floors in the barn and now spills out into the woodshed, the Cheap Art bus across the road, and onto the walls of the Paper-Mache Cathedral behind the barn.

Pittsburgh Children's Museum

10 Children's Way
Pittsburgh, PA
pittsburghkids.org/exhibits/fred-rogers-us
412-322-5058

Photo: Joe Fulton

Original Puppets from Mister Rogers' Neighborhood

Pittsburgh Children's Museum

Monday-Sunday 10am-5pm
Included with Museum Admission

Fred Rogers is a beloved icon for Pittsburgh and has been a bedrock for Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh since its inception – as an advisor, a mentor and a friend. We believe it’s important to continue to memorialize Fred’s wonderful and meaningful work, as well as help today’s children and families better relate to his many invaluable messages.

King Friday XIII, Queen Sarah Saturday, Henrietta Pussycat, X the Owl, Lady Elaine Fairchilde, Daniel Striped Tiger and Gran Pere greet you as you enter the Nursery exhibit.

Fowler Museum at UCLA

308 Charles E Young Dr N
Los Angeles, CA
fowler.ucla.edu/research
310-825-4361

The Helstien Collection

Fowler Museum at UCLA

Wednesday, Friday, Saturday, Sunday - 12pm-5pm
Thursday - 12pm-8pm
Free

Since the early tenth century BCE, historians, grammarians, priests, and poets have celebrated the art of puppetry in India. Deeply rooted in the Hindu tradition, shadow puppetry is a form of folk theater that is transmitted orally and performed by itinerant puppeteers and musicians who travel the vast countryside. Today, it is a fast-disappearing art, and its demise threatens the traditional tales, stories of local village life, and reworkings of the great Hindu epics Ramayana and Mahabharata. This collection provides access to the field research materials of the late Dr. Melvyn Helstein, professor of theater arts at UCLA, who collected nearly six hundred puppets for the Museum’s collections. Materials include interviews with puppet makers from South India, transcriptions of plays, slides capturing the drama of these nighttime performances, several volumes of diapositives, and pen-and-ink illustrations of puppets.

Ballard Institute and Museum of Puppetry

1 Royce Circle
Mansfield, CT
bimp.uconn.edu
860-486-8580

The World of Puppetry: From the Collections of the Ballard Institute

Ballard Institute and Museum of Puppetry

Tuesday-Sunday: 11:00am-7:00pm
see website for details

The World of Puppetry: From the Collections of the Ballard Institute showcases an array of different puppets carefully selected from over 2,600 puppets in the Ballard Institute collections to reflect the amazing richness of global puppet traditions and contemporary innovations in puppetry. The exhibition’s array of handpuppets, marionettes, rod puppets, toy theaters, and shadow figures from around the world will include work by Rufus and Margo Rose, Charles Ludlam, Janie Geiser, Marjorie Batchelder McPharlin, Tony Sarg, Bil Baird, Frank Ballard, and puppets from Indonesia, Africa, Iran, Germany, England, Latin America, and France.

Aurora Valentinetti Puppet Museum

257 Fourth Street
Bremerton, WA
www.ectandpuppets.org
360-373-2992

The Aurora Valentinetti Puppet Museum

Evergreen Children's Theatre

Wednesday-Saturday 11:00am-4:00pm
Bremerton's First Friday Art Walk, each month from 5:00pm - 8:00pm

In its 12th year, the Museum, a division of Evergreen Children's Theatre, has a unique history in the Northwest, Puget Sound area. While small the Museum has attracted the attention of local and international donors and collectors. Two large gifts from China were received in 2004 and 2005 with the Lt. Gov. Brad Owen assepting them on its behalf. Last year Bremerton's Sister City, Kure, Japan donated 3 Bunraku style puppets to the Museum in recognition of the 50 year Anniversary of their Sister City program. Relying on gifts the collection now numbers over 1100 items from around the world. Changing exhibits are presented throughout the year.

Puppetry in NYC title image is from Project B - 3 Works, photo by Jane Stein.